10 Popular YA books I haven’t read (yet)

Hello and welcome (back) to beebliophile! I’m currently trying to post once a week, and after a week of looking at the task in my bullet journal I have finally pulled myself together and I’m writing a post!

The Twilight Series by Stephenie Meyer

This one has recently come to my attention due to the announcement that Stephenie Meyer is releasing another book, Midnight Sun. In case you haven’t heard, it’s Twilight but from Edward’s perspective. While I have considered reading these books many times, the lack of LGBTQ+ characters and the whole Bella deciding between 2 frankly creepy boys put me off a bit. I’m thinking of reading them, just to see what’s up before Midnight Sun is released. I’ve seen the movies though, so I already have a rough idea of the plot.


The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I don’t have a good reason for not reading this. I want to read it and it’s meant to be excellent, I’ve just never got round to it and I’m not a huge reader of contemporary. As soon as I get my hands on a copy, I’m gonna read it.


The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

As I just said, I’m not a huge reader of contemporary YA. I’ve watched this movie, it was sad I guess. I’ve read a couple of John Green’s other books and I wasn’t gripped so I probably won’t end up reading this. Plus for personal reasons I don’t want to read about people with cancer at the moment.


The Perks of being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

This is starting to be a bit of a theme, I’ve seen the movie but I haven’t read the book. I promise I usually read the book first, it’s just I’m a huge fan of contemporary YA films and not so much the books. I’m on the fence about this one- maybe I’ll read it, maybe I won’t.


The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Once again, you know it, I’ve seen the movie and haven’t read the book. This book I would like to read however, because I really enjoyed the movie and I’d love to know the writer’s style in telling the story. Why I haven’t read it? Just never got my hands on a copy.


All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Surprisingly I haven’t seen the movie for this one. Shocking, I know, but it didn’t really grab me. That’s the reason I haven’t read the book or watched the movie. And it’s a good enough reason for me.


The Sun is also a Star by Nicola Yoon

This one also has a Netflix movie which I haven’t watched. Contemporary YA, not my thing, didn’t grab me. Nothing more to say really.


Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott

I actually recently watched the movie based on this book and it was very emotional. Still, probably won’t read it. Now I’ve seen the movie I know what happens and my lack of enthusiasm for contemporary YA means I likely won’t read it.


His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman

Let me say I have strong intentions to read these books, I really do. I even have The Book of Dust from the prequel series on my bookshelf. Yeah, I really don’t have a reason for not reading these except I haven’t got round to it.


13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher

I haven’t watched the TV series and I haven’t read the book and I don’t really intend to consume either. I’ve seen a lot of bad reviews of both and I’m put off. Just not for me.


So those are 10 popular YA books I haven’t read yet. Now you may be thinking- ‘Bee, why are there so many contemporary YA there when you don’t really like them a lot?’ You make a good point. The problem is when I looked for more popular YA books I haven’t read there aren’t many, because I have read a lot of popular YA fantasy. Like, A LOT. That’s why there’s so much contemporary YA on here. If you want to check out which books I have read, pop over to my goodreads!

Have I missed your favourite YA books? Do you think I should read the ones above? Comment below or feel free to contact me using this page, instagram or twitter!

Dry Review

Dry by Neal and Jarrod Shusterman

I first saw Dry in Waterstones months ago, and I was super excited when it finally came into the library! I don’t know if this is a good idea or a bad idea, reviewing a disaster scenario book given the current circumstances, but at least this one is climate-change related not pandemic related, right? Either way if you want a break from coronavirus related news and want to lose yourself in a completely different disaster, Dry is a great option.

Dry follows the actions of a girl, Alyssa, and her younger brother as they navigate life immediately after the taps run dry in South California, with no signs of water coming back soon. The story follows multiple viewpoints, each one added in as Alyssa meets them. She ends up forming a group with her next-door neighbour called Kelton, a badass girl named Jacqui, a rich boy named Henry and her younger brother. The story is told chronologically, day by day, with snapshots of random other people interspersed throughout to show what is happening elsewhere. The viewpoints of Alyssa and her companions are all first person, whereas the snapshots are third person, distinctly marking them out and making sure you stay focused on the important characters. The book is divided into parts and each part is a different stage of their journey, which breaks up the story nicely.

Within a few pages I was wishing I had read this book sooner! Neal and Jarrod Shusterman have written a brilliant book together, I’d love for them to write more. The book begins with a really interesting concept that is made more engaging by how possible it is, to the extent where I was slightly freaked out by it. With climate change getting worse by the day, running out of water might be real in the future and the way it plays out in the book seems very realistic. I genuinely flinched when someone disturbed me because I was so absorbed in the book, it was tense and dramatic and I never knew what was going to happen next.

The writing kept me on edge, with distinct viewpoints and the ability to evoke mood vividly, whether it be in a fight or a relaxed car drive. I could not stop reading and I didn’t want to, especially as the chapters grew shorter towards the end as they built to the climax. The ending was heart stopping, but followed with a little of the aftermath. I am a big fan of being shown the consequences of the story on the world and characters and I prefer it not to be in an epilogue because the epilogues are often removed whereas I want to stay with the characters I’ve got so attached to. Would I survive this book? Yeah, I’d be in the UK!

This Lie Will Kill You Review

This Lie Will Kill You by Chelsea Pitcher

Slightly confusingly, I am posting this review before the review of All Your Twisted Secrets by Diana Urban, despite reading it after. I mention this because my first thought when seeing the premise was that it seemed like the one for All Your Twisted Secrets- a mixture of students invited to a location to get some prize money. I was wrong. The books had two similarities- the one just mentioned, and that they were both awesome. Apart from that, they went in different directions with different styles.

This Lie Will Kill You follows a bunch of students who are invited to a mysterious mansion for a murder mystery game, the prize being $50,000. It starts with a thrilling prologue, mysteriously introducing the antagonist. The first few chapters are labelled with the role of the character it is following- class act, drama queen, golden boy, meat head and lone wolf. The multiple character, third person perspective continues throughout the book, allowing the reader insight into the drama happening simultaneously throughout the large mansion. Throughout, there are lots of references to an event that happened at a party the year earlier which all the characters were somehow involved him. Clues are dropped at various points, leaving the reader increasingly curious and trying and piece together what happened.

The atmosphere is consistently tense, as well as being very intense. The story swallowed me up and left me willing to kill to know what happened. Even the memories the characters reflect on from the past are mysterious, only providing small bits of context and explanation at a time. The ending was a total surprise, with so many twists. Every time you thought you had resolved something, another layer of the web was revealed. Would I survive this book? Probably, because I don’t go to parties so wouldn’t have gone to the one the year before.

All Your Twisted Secrets Review

All Your Twisted Secrets by Diana Urban

I’ll start by saying I was very kindly gifted and advance copy of this by Harper Teen, so thank you! I’m on a bit of a YA crime streak at the moment- I recently read two Karen M. McManus books, and my next book to read is This Lie Will Kill You. I never think of this as one of my favourite genres, but after all these I think I may reconsider because I’ve really enjoyed them. All Your Twisted Secrets will be released in two days, on the 17th March 2020.

All Your Twisted Secrets is Diana Urban’s debut novel, and honestly I can’t wait for her next one. It follows the queen bee, star athlete, valedictorian, stoner, loser and music geek after they are invited to a scholarship dinner, then locked in there. They are given a choice- poison someone or a bomb will kill them all. They have one hour.

The main viewpoint followed is that of the music geek, Amber Prescott. Diana quickly and smoothly establishes the setting and characters without it being obvious or clunky. There are two different storylines followed, the present in the scholarship dinner and the past. The present stretches over the course of an hour, while the past follows the events over the course of about a year. The characters are all linked in different ways, some obvious and some less so, and all the characters are well rounded and interesting, especially the ways in which they change under pressure. All the characters are around my age, 17, which was a bit strange because a lot of their drama and secrets could never happen to me. Nonetheless, I was engaged throughout and could hardly put it down.

The setting of this novel was perfect. An empty restaurant, the locked room, the elaborate dining setup and the rising temperature of the room. As the heat increases so do tensions, with incredible sensory descriptions to immerse the reader in the situation. The drama which unfolds is a mix of secrets being revealed and the consequences of the students’ actions as they desperately try to escape the room. Alliances are made and broken all in the space of an hour, under the watching eye of a ticking bomb.

The ending was perfection. I loved it. Despite all the twists and turns, I never saw this one coming. Oh My Goodness. Would I survive this book? That would be spoilers.

Letting Go Short Review

Letting Go by Cat Clarke

When I ordered this book from the library, I was expecting a full-length book. It turned out to be a novella, which was a surprise but it did make a nice short read. From the blurb I just really wanted to know how Agnes got herself into her situation.

Letting Go follows Agnes as she goes hiking up a mountain with her ex-girlfriend and the ex’s new boyfriend. You can tell it’s going to be awkward, and it is very, but it’s much more than that. It was a lot deeper than I thought it was going to be, and it definitely took a turn. I felt bad for Agnes throughout the story and Cat Clarke managed to set up the characters and their backstories quickly and with enough detail that I cared what happened.  If I say much more, I’ll give away the twist, but I would recommend reading this. It’s a quick, good teen read about relationships and mountain climbing.

I was pleased with the ending. Overall, a satisfactory experience. Would I survive this book? Yes. Although I’m really not sure how I would get myself into that situation.

Two Can Keep a Secret Review

Two Can Keep a Secret by Karen M. McManus

This is the third of Karen McManus’ books I’ve read so far, and definitely my favourite. It had darker undertones and a tenser atmosphere than the other books, which I loved. It follows twins called Ellery and Ezra as they move to Echo Ridge, where two homecoming disappeared in the past and one was found dead, including the twins’ aunt. When they arrive strange things start happening, graffiti threatening to take another homecoming queen and anonymous threats. Ellery is true crime obsessed after her mom’s twin sister disappeared and her mom refuses to talk about it, while Ezra is more friendly and trusting.
There are two viewpoints followed, Ellery and the younger brother of a main suspect in one of the previous disappearances. Because of the small-town nature of echo ridge, the community is very interconnected and Ellery quickly begins trying to unravel the web of secrets that surrounds it. The plot twists start early and keep on coming, shocking me every single time. I probably should have seen some coming but I was so absorbed in the story that I didn’t put the book down long enough to come up with theories!
The book is brilliantly plotted with an array of individual characters, and a great climax followed by an incredibly satisfying ending. Even if you didn’t enjoy the other books so much, I definitely recommend trying this one, because it does have a slightly different feel. My one gripe is that there was a character called Chad. Why is there always a character called Chad in YA books?
Would I survive this book? Yep, I’m not cool enough to be a homecoming queen.

February 2020 Round-Up

So here we are again. The end of a month, where I round up my favourite books of the month/ scream into the void hoping it will choose the books for me. Since it is a leap year so February has an extra day, and also because I can do whatever I like on my blog, I am going to give my favourite book from this month, followed by a few more which were awesome

THE WINNER – QUEEN OF NOTHING BY HOLLY BLACK

Let me have everything I ever wanted, everything I ever dreamed, and eternal misery along with it. Let me live on with an ice shard through my heart.

Holly Black, Queen of Nothing

What I liked about it: everything. Jude. Cardan. Faeries. Humour and beauty. Plot twists galore. AN epic conclusion to this trilogy.

What I didn’t like about it: it’s the end of the series 😥

My favourite character: Jude all the wayyyyyyyy. She’s so badass and powerful and unashamed of wanting power.

Position in series: 3/3

Genres: young adult, fantasy, romance

THE OTHERS THAT I LOVED

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

What I liked about it: murder. It is set near where I live. Andie just straight up ignoring everyone who tells her what to do. The tension. The mixture of formats including transcripts and case notes.

What I didn’t like about it: I did not know there’s meant to be a sequel released this year. Also, the sequel hasn’t been released yet, which is very upsetting.

My favourite character: Andie. She just does what she wants but in a nice way.

Position in series: 1/3?

Genres: crime, young adult, contemporary, mystery, thriller

The Places I’ve Cried in Public by Holly Bourne

What I liked about it: the emotions. The contrast of past and present. More emotions. The slow unravelling of the story.

What I didn’t like about it: I have mentioned three authors on this page so far and they’re all called Holly. This is beyond confusing.

My favourite character: Amelie, my poor sweetheart.

Position in series: 1/1

Genres: contemporary, young adult, romance-ish

It’s Not OK to Feel Blue and Other Lies

What I liked about it: honest, diverse, emotional, easy to read because it’s made up of lots of short pieces.

What I didn’t like about it: Sometimes I got a bit confused because occasionally a sentence would be in massive letters to emphasise it. But that’s probably just me.

Genres: nonfiction, mental health

Pride, collected by Juno Dawson

What I liked about it: A range of genres, easy to read and lots of adorable LGBTQ+ relationships

What I didn’t like about it:  It wasn’t long enough

My favourite character: Can’t remember her name but the girl with the phoenix

Position in series: N/A

Genres: LGBTQ+, short stories, anthology, poetry

And so that concludes my February roundup! February has seemed a very, very long time, and I don’t think it’s just because of the extra day. With three family birthdays, a hospital appointment, college, half term, two new piercings, a couple of cinema trips, a museum trip, a talk from Mary Beard and 17 books read, I’m definitely ready for some rest and relaxation in March. Preferably with more reading time. I hope you’ve all had a good February, and I’d love to hear what you’ve been up to.

My writing: an introduction

Hello everyone!

Like a lot of readers, I am also a big fan of writing my own stuff, and I definitely want to talk about both writing and reading on my blog so I thought I’d start with an introduction before I throw you in the deep end with my ramblings.

I have two main types of writing I do: fiction and poetry.

I have always wanted to write a book, and it is one of my dreams to have a novel published. I always have loads of random ideas swirling around my head, as well as my phone notes which are full of random words and sentences which popped into my head, and when I found out about National Novel Writing Month 2019 (NaNoWriMo) I impulsively decided to start writing the YA fantasy novel that had been hanging around my head for a couple of months. I unadvisedly decided to do this the day before NaNoWriMo started, with literally just a couple of plot points, one character and a vague sense of the world. I did the young writers challenge and set my goal as 30,000 words in November, which sounds like a lot and honestly, I’m still shocked that I completed it!

NaNoWriMo is great, and I would highly recommend it if you just want to take the plunge and start writing, but you feel like something has been holding you back. For me, I basically built the world, characters and plot as I went along. This was good in some ways, since I wasn’t worrying over whether I was sticking to a non-existent plan, but definitely had some downsides since I kept (and keep) forgetting details and what I had named my characters. I set myself the goal of writing about 1000 words a day. Some days I wrote more, and some days I wrote less but it averaged out and I completed my goal. One of my main motivations was the goal count bar chart on the homepage of the NaNoWriMo website, which allowed me to track my progress in a very satisfying way. It had lots of other features as well, but I mainly focused on inputting my word count each day.

After NaNoWriMo ended I kept writing, albeit a lot less. It’s very hard to find time every day to write, especially around Christmas! In the new year I returned to sixth form college and since I have the habit of spending lots of time in the library, I started writing a bit more again. I had no idea where my first novel was going to end, but I came to realise my ideas were certainly not going to fit in one book. On Friday (January 31st) I finished my first draft, realising that my story had come to a natural conclusion in its first part. I now have a first draft of 73,000 words, so the next step will be editing. I’m going to leave it for a week to give myself a modicum of objectivity, then print it out and begin the edits. Scary. That pretty much sums up my novel’s journey so far, apart from that short interlude a few weeks ago when I had a great idea for a different novel and spent a couple of days noting it down, before forcing myself to return to the first story because I was so close to the end it would be ridiculous to stop now.

So, what about poetry? I am a big fan of poetry, especially as I’ve gotten older. My favourite type of poetry is probably haikus, mixed with spoken word poetry. My favourite poetry is either on nature, or social issues such as being LGBTQ+, feminism and diet culture. I used to write poetry whenever inspiration struck, but I wanted to get into a more regular poetry writing habit, so I now write a haiku every evening, just to keep myself going. This does mean that some of them are completely terrible and will never see the light of day. My poetry tends to be very personal, written with lots of emotions especially when I’m sad or angry.

To conclude, I like writing. Thank you for reading about my writing, and I hope it was interesting. If you have any questions or queries about writing or reading or anything feel free to email me or get in touch over social media, and I would love to hear what kind of writing other people do!