3 World Mental Health Day Reading Recommendations

When I saw that it was World Mental Health Day on the 10th October, I immediately wanted to write a post recommending a couple of books that I have found useful or relatable in their coverage of mental health. I even wrote a little list of books on my phone, which I fully intended to turn into a post immediately. It has been a rather long immediately of 3 days, but we got here eventually so let’s get into it!

Mental health is a very important topic to me. I have struggled with depression and an eating disorder, and I know how isolating it can feel when everyone else seems to be coping with the world fine and your brain is on fire. Please, please, please reach out to someone. Anyone. You don’t have to do this alone and you do not deserve to feel bad, whatever your thoughts tell you. Friends and family are a great option for a more casual chat, and if your bouts of bad mental health are frequent then it may be a good idea to talk to a doctor. If the idea of talking to someone in person makes you want to curl up into a ball and roll into a volcano, then there are organisations you can text, call or message online depending on what you’re most comfortable doing. I’ll leave some links at the bottom of the post for you to check out if you feel you need them.

Everyone’s experience of mental health is unique so the books that speak to me might not speak to you in the same way, but I hope these might give you some reading ideas, or help spark a discussion with people you know about mental health. Also, while I will not be discussing sensitive topics in this post, some of these books will contain them so make sure to check content warnings if you are worried that they may affect you.

1. It’s Okay to Feel Blue

It’s Okay to Feel Blue is a collection of writings about mental health by over 70 people. It really does have something for everyone, and I highly recommend it if you want something that you can dip in and out of easily. For my full review, click here.

2. Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Reasons to Stay Alive is an incredible book filled with Haig’s experiences of mental health. It is a mixture of conversations and personal anecdotes and lists, each one only a couple of pages each, so it is very easy to read. I think both people who have struggled with their mental health and those who haven’t should read this book, because it has some really great ways of describing how it feels to have depression. Also by Matt Haig is Notes on a Nervous Planet, another excellent nonfiction which also covers mental health but in a more general way, again in a fragmented format.

3. Anything by Holly Bourne

Holly Bourne is a writer or teen fiction and recently(ish) released her first adult novel. Her books frequently cover topics such as mental health, being yourself, relationships, and feminism. She is one of the authors that I will automatically read without even looking at the blurb- her writing is so emotional and honest. I will recommend them to pretty much anyone who wants to read some incredible contemporary fiction.

I decided to keep this short and sweet because I think long lists can definitely be overwhelming sometimes! Obviously there are lots of books that cover mental health, these are just a couple of my favourites.

List of UK mental health helplines here and another one here .

List of US mental health helplines here and here .

Please don’t suffer in silence, and look after yourself. Everyone has mental health, so even if you don’t have any particular problems with it you should still look after it like you would with physical health. Take a moment to breathe and check in with yourself- how are you feeling right now?

If you ever want someone to chat to, I’m happy to listen. Just message me on one of the links below or use my email on the links page. I hope you’re all having a good week ❤

Reading Rush 2020 TBR

Last night, I impulsively decided to sign myself up for The Reading Rush 2020. For those who don’t know, it’s a week-long readathon where you try to attempt to read 7 books in 7 days. For more information or if you want to sign up, click here. Now I’m not sure if I’m actually going to be able to complete it because I have been reading incredibly slowly recently, only 1-2 books a week. However I’m going to give it a go and trying to only use books I already own. Without further ado, I will introduce the seven book categories and what I will be reading for them. Probably.

There is also an instagram challenge, but I only have so much organisation and taking pictures of myself as a character is a bit of a stretch. If you do take part, I’d love to see your pictures so feel free to tag me @beebliophil3.

1. Read a book with a cover that matches the colour of your birth stone.

This is the first book I looked for was this one, and I immediately saw The Map of Knowledge by Violet Moller. My dad got it for me a week or two ago and it is a nonfiction book about seven ancient cities. I am a big classics geek, so reading about ancient history has me super excited to begin this book.

2. Read a book that starts with the word “The”.

This was a little harder, but not much. I only had to open a couple of books, and I’ll be honest I haven’t decided which book to read yet. I guess I’ll see what I feel like? The two books I’m thinking of are Damsel by Elana K. Arnold or Unravel Me by Tahereh Mafi. I have Damsel in the form of an ARC, and it’s a fairytale type story where a princess wakes up and is expected to marry a prince. Unravel Me is the second in a series, about a girl whose touch is lethal.

3. Read a book that inspired a movie you’ve already seen.

This was a hard one and I didn’t have a physical book for this, so I went to my online library and found a copy of The Perks of Being a Wallflower. I watched the movie over a year ago and I can’t actually remember what happened so I figured now was the perfect time to read it without the ending being spoiled.

4. Read the first book you touch.

The first book I touched yesterday morning was The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison. I had forgotten about the challenge and I read the first 2 pages of this book on Sunday 19th, so when I picked up a book to read over breakfast, this book became part of my challenge. It’s abut a boy who becomes emperor when his father and older brothers are all killed in a crash.

5. Read a book completely outside of your house.

Raybearer by Jordan Ifueko was a random choice, something I’ve been really looking forward to reading. It only arrived a couple of days ago so I haven’t read any of this book and I will be reading it outside in the garden most likely. It is about a girl raised by a mysterious lady to eventually go and assassinate the crown prince. The cover is beautiful and the premise is awesome so I’m excited, even if I have to leave my house every time I want to read a bit.

6. Read a book in a genre that you’ve always wanted to read more of.

I had trouble finding a book for this, mainly because I read fantasy and only occasional books from other genres. I haven’t decided which book I’m going to go for, but it’s between No Big Deal by Bethany Rutter (contemporary) and one of my nonfiction books about Ancient Greece. Again, with this one I’m just going to see how I feel in the moment. No Big Deal is about a fat girl finding her footing and body positivity. The books about Ancient Greece are about various elements of Ancient Greece.

7. Read a book that takes place on a different continent than where you live.

If I was buying a book for this I would have chosen somewhere a bit more exciting, but unfortunately I don’t, so I am reading The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern which I believe is set in America. Don’t get me wrong, I am thrilled to finally reading this because I adored The Night Circus, but it has definitely got me thinking that I should read more books based in different continents. Also, I read loads of fantasy so technically they’re all on a different continent, just not a real one. I didn’t know if that counted so I played it safe.

Those are the 7 books I will be attempting to read this week. In an attempt to stop myself getting distracted by other books, I have set them up in a pile on my desk so I cannot ignore them! If you’ve read any of these books or you’re taking part in the reading rush I’d love to hear from you, so use one of the social links or comment below. I hope you’re all well and have a great week (and finish all your books if you’re participating!)

Friday Favourites

Hello bookbees! I’ve decided to try something new this Friday and so as well as my favourite book, I’m also going to include my other favourites from this week! I haven’t been the most productive this week, but in my defence it’s the first week of the summer holidays. I keep forgetting which day it is which is both funny and alarming. The picture for this post isn’t book-related, but it is taken by me and I thought it was quite pretty 🙂

Favourite book: Queen of Storms by Raymond E. Feist

Yes, technically this is the only book I’ve read this week but I’d like to point out it is really awesome. He writes quite traditional fantasy which has its pros and cons, the pros being it’s great fun with cool world-building and pretty interesting plot, the cons being some traditional gender roles and a disappointing lack of LGBTQ+ characters. It was an eARC from Edelweiss, and the app doesn’t work on my phone so I am reading this book on my laptop. A bit of a strange experience, but here I am and it’s not that bad.

Favourite movie: The Old Guard on Netflix

I started watching this movie because I was a little bored and quite like action/adventure movies with a hint of sci-fi. I kept watching this movie because it’s awesome. Now, I’m not an expert on movies but I thoroughly enjoyed this movie. I think it had a good plot, characters I absolutely fell in love with (especially Charlize Theron, my current celebrity crush) and a cool concept, with a plot point that’s stuck in my mind since.

Favourite TV show: Scorpion

At my brother’s recommendation, I started a new series called Scorpion. I have been watching it non-stop since I started it, and although it’s not exactly realistic I love the characters and the drama. The series is roughly based off the life of a real guy called Walter O’Brien, and it’s about a group of geniuses who work for homeland security in the USA. There’s a great balance between character relationships and high-adrenaline scenarios.

Favourite food: Crunchy Nut Cornflakes

I am a big fan of cereal. Cereal is good, whether you’re eating it first thing in the morning or last thing at night and the other day my Dad bought a big box of crunchy nut cornflakes, which we haven’t had for a while. It’s delicious and sweet and crunchy and tastes great with a sprinkle of sultanas (I adore sultanas for some reason at the moment.)

Favourite animal: Wombat

It was a hard decision between wombats and muntjac deer, but in the end the cuteness of wombats won out. Especially baby wombats, have you seen a baby wombat?! The reason wombats are on my mind because I am currently growing out a buzzcut, and my hair is now too long to look like a buzz-cut but too short to look like any sane haircut. Then I realised- I look like a wombat, my hair is even the perfect colour! The reason muntjac deer are on my mind because I’ve seen several round my local area, including one with a baby deer!

So those are my favourite things from this week! I might do this again since I had a lot of fun doing it, but I’d love to hear what you think of it. Feel free to let me know in the comments or using one of my social media linked down below. I hope you’ve all had a great week and achieved whatever you wanted to.

Skulduggery Pleasant: Bedlam (and all the others) Review

Skulduggery Pleasant: Bedlam by Derek Landy Review. Also a vague review of the second series overall, which assumes you have knowledge of the first series as well. If you don’t, this is going to be quite confusing. For example, Skulduggery is a skeleton and this is a world with magic. If you haven’t read the first series, they are excellent and I highly recommend you go and read them then come back!

I LOVE the Skulduggery Pleasant series. I read the first series and was completely obsessed with them, seeing Valkyrie grow up and realise her destiny with Skulduggery Pleasant always by her side with an army of suits and sassy comebacks. The books had a colourful cast of characters who you couldn’t help but like, hate, or both! They were always so easy to read and slip into, full of plot twists and unexpected events that never felt forced while still paying attention to the normal like Valkyrie was neglecting due to her wild adventures and how she tried to balance them. If you haven’t read them, do it. You don’t need to be a kid or a teenager to enjoy the ride.

When I saw Derek Landy was bringing back the Skulduggery Pleasant series I was excited, especially since they would continue to follow Valkyrie and Skulduggery as well as introducing some new characters. Bedlam is the third book in the resurrection of the series, and for me the best thing is Valkyrie. Yes, she is still a badass main character who travels around solving (and causing) problems with Skulduggery, but she has grown. She is in her early twenties and behaves accordingly, and Landy includes Valkyrie trying to cope with the massive trauma of the events of the previous series and the effect it has had on her adult life. Her dynamic with Skulduggery has evolved with the series and I’m so glad, because it shows the reality of relationships changing as you get older. SPOILER ALERT FOR BEDLAM ALTHOUGH IT IS FOUND OUT IN THE FIRST CHAPTER: Valkyrie has a girlfriend! It made me very, very happy. And leads to a funny scene with Fletcher.

Because this series is introducing new plots, where Valkyrie is not the main recipient of the prophecies, there are more characters and plot lines to follow. It can feel a little chaotic at times, flicking between perspectives. One of the main ones is Omen Darkly, the younger brother of the chosen one. I like Omen, he is quite obviously meant to be the useless younger brother but he’s great and quite relatable at times. Both Fletcher and Tanith make appearances in Bedlam, characters I am thrilled to see again because nostalgia. Derek Landy continues to write 3-dimensional villains and characters who aren’t good or bad, just living their life and I like the lack of distinction, the blurring of the line which separates good from evil.

The world we are plunged into is a world familiar but changed, since as with Valkyrie, Landy shows the aftereffects of the previous wars and the way this would be reflected in the world. For me, this made the book really interesting as it deepened my understanding of the world while continuing to throw in delightful details. With his characteristic humour, Landy kept me grinning throughout the whole book while getting me emotionally invested in a plot with far too much happening at once, although there are a few moments of normality amongst the chaos which provide a welcome break.

In conclusion: Valkyrie is hot, Omen is hilarious and Skulduggery is Skulduggery. Not much more I could ask for really, and I will definitely be reading the next one. Since the first series both Valkyrie and I have realised we like girls, a lovely parallel which randomly occurred to me while I was writing this. If you’ve got this far and haven’t read the series yet, do it. A well-built world with plenty happening and buckets of fun. Some books you read and a month later have forgotten what happened. I can still remember loads of the first Skulduggery Pleasant series and I read them years ago. Just go for it.

I hope you’re all well, and enjoying your summer! I’m now on my summer holidays, although I have quite a bit of revision to do for my exams in September. It’s strange because holidays don’t feel that different to school anymore; it’s all at home. Anyone else experiencing this, or does your life have more distinct lines between work and home? Let me know.

A Booktiful Love Review

Rating: 2 out of 5.

A Booktiful Love is a collection of poems by Tolu’ A. Akinyemi. It is described as ‘a collection of poems that deal with the entirety of human experience in its various forms.’ I received an ebook in return for an honest review, so rest assured that all the opinions expressed here are my own.

What really struck me about this book was the writer’s biography at the end- he is VERY qualified! He is: a business analyst, financial crime consultant, a Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specialist, a personal development and career coach, a writer with 10 years experience, a mentor at several schools, a trained economist, has a Masters’ Degree, and has featured in several poetry festivals. Like… wow!

A Booktiful Love is split into several different sections with a wide variety of topics, quite random at times. For example, it starts with a poem about loo-roll scarcity, which made it very clear that this poem had been written since the start of lockdown! The poems are definitely accessible with simple and direct language.

I don’t have any particularly strong feelings about this collection of poems. The poem has some nice ideas, quite typical at times, some more interesting poems towards the end of the collection. The language can be vivid, the simplicity and directness effective for some topics. I found the more personal poems more engaging, for example when the author talked about his mother and his view on politics. Occasionally there was some rhyming, and I do love some rhyming.

The title poem, in my opinion, was not anything extraordinary although I do like the title. I do prefer more figurative and elaborate language in poetry, but that’s just personal preference and I do like that the poems say what they mean and are direct. The only poems I actively dislike where a few consecutive ones in the middle with were all named ‘Beauty and …”. They were clearly about a woman he loves, but they made me uncomfortable, particularly lines like ‘she is my prize’.

In conclusion this is an accessible collection of poems with a with a wide range of subjects and a simple, direct style, so if that is how you like your poetry or you are just getting into poetry I suggest you give it a go!

I can’t believe it’s July already! Half the year is gone which is absolutely crazy, and I’m coming to the end of my penultimate year at school. It doesn’t feel like that much time has passed because of all the time we’ve spent under lockdown, like we’re living in an alternate universe or something. Going back to school in September is definitely going to be very strange. What does the end of June mean to you? Let me know in the comments or on one of my social platforms linked below!

May 2020 Roundup

‘Bee, why am I reading a May Roundup in July?’ I hear you ask. Well, funny story that’s not actually that funny. I consistently forgot about this post all the way through June and my perfectionism hates the idea of missing a month, so we’re about to take a look at the top 5 books I read in May. Don’t worry though- you’ll get my June favourites next week (hopefully)! Without further ado let’s get into the post, since it’s already a month late.

Book 1: Good Girl, Bad Blood by Holly Jackson

Genre: young adult, crime, contemporary, mystery, thriller

What I liked: I absolutely loved this book, and when I write my full-length review it will be GLOWING. Holly Jackson does an incredible job of building suspense, creating vivid and loveable characters and dropping tiny clues throughout leading to the final revelation.

What I didn’t like: There isn’t another one yet

I’d recommend it to: fans of true crime, fans of young adult books, people who like a really good, suspenseful crime investigation

Book 2: Leonard and Hungry Paul by Ronan Hession

Genre: I don’t really know how to describe it. Contemporary fiction, but not like I’ve ever read before.

What I liked: This story doesn’t really have any conflict. At all. It is a celebration of the everyday, with gentle, elegant writing and human characters you grow an affection for.

What I didn’t like: There isn’t really anything I disliked, although I can see how some people who like lots of action might find it a bit boring

I’d recommend it to: anyone who wants to look at the ordinary world with new eyes, anyone looking for a book that’s easy to read and a little different.

Book 3: Hope is the Thing with Feathers by Emily Dickinson

Genre: poetry

What I liked: Everything. I adore Emily Dickinson’s poetry, I think it’s stunning. For a longer review, check out one I wrote earlier

What I didn’t like: Nothing. I would have loved to know her.

I’d recommend it to: fans of poetry. Anyone who can appreciate brilliant writing.

Book 4: The Madness Vase by Andrea Gibson

Genre: poetry

What I liked: the long poems, a series of different topics all flowing into one another seamlessly. The vivid language, frequent and precise use of metaphors and similes and personification. Gibson isn’t afraid to talk about big topics such as politics, the patriarchy and gender norms. My favourite poem was ‘I Sing the Body Electric, Especially When My Power’s Out’.

What I didn’t like: Poetry books are too short. I need more poems!

I’d recommend it to: fans of poetry that addresses a wide variety of topics including gender, sexuality, politics, the patriarchy, capitalism and much more.

Book 5: Gemsigns by Stephanie Saulter

Genre: fantasy, fiction, science fiction

What I liked: I loved the political element of this novel, and the way Saulter takes a look at issues such as race, class and religion in a futuristic society, while examining moral issues and creating a cast of fascinating characters and an intriguing world.

What I didn’t like: I found this book a little hard to connect with at times, but overall I really enjoyed reading it. The start is maybe a bit slow?

I’d recommend it to: fans of fantasy and futuristic society, those interested in genetic modifications and the social implications of the issue.

So, that brings us to the end of my top 5 books of May! I definitely had to take a look at the notes I made while reading these books, because they’re not as fresh in my mind as they should have been if I had written this a month ago. I’ve just found lockdown, even several months in, has completely thrown my sense of routine and organisation. My room is a mess! Has lockdown made you more or less organised? Let me know down below in the comments or on one of my social platforms- I love hearing from you. 🙂

Sunshine and Whiskey by Lauren White Review

Rating: 2 out of 5.

Sunshine and Whiskey is a collection of poems by Lauren White. I was very kindly gifted an ebook of this book in return for an honest review, so all opinions expressed here are my own. As you might already know from previous posts, I have been reading a lot of poetry recently so I have lots of poetry books to review!

A bit about the author: Lauren White grew up in Maryland, and she is an engineer. She earned her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from University of Maryland, College Park and her M.S. in Systems Engineering from Naval Postgraduate School. In her free time she likes trying new whiskies, writing poetry and Star Trek.

I have mixed opinions about Sunshine and Whiskey, which is split into several sections such as Summer, Lauren and Broken. That is not to say any of the poetry is bad; in fact most of the poems were simple and well-written. I really enjoyed the rhyming White used in her poems and the mood she evoked in some of the poems was wonderful, with little details that really immersed me in the scene. There were some cliche lines, but these were accompanied by some cool original imagery.

The poems were predominantly long and free form, made up of short lines. They often had really obscure words as titles which I loved, because I am obsessed with finding out new words so I really enjoyed looking up what these meant. I was less a fan of the random pop culture references such as X-men, as I tend to prefer timeless poetry, but the self confidence shown in some of the poems was very inspiring.

As for the subjects of the poems, there was a variety. My favourites were the ones White wrote about herself, so it was rather disappointing that the majority of the collection were about relationships. The poems about heartbreak just seemed to go on forever and became a bit repetitive, definitely for more mature readers because lots of them focused on someone leaving her and her lying in bed remembering them having sex and touching. None of the poems were graphic in that sense, but it just got boring when every poem was slightly different ways of describing the same thing.

In conclusion I would recommend this collection if you are interested in reading lots of poems about love, heartbreak and missing someone. The ones White writes about herself and any other topic are more engaging, however they are sadly dwarfed by the sheer volume of poems focused on unnamed partner(s).

I hope you’re all well and staying safe! I know my reviewing has been patchy recently, but I am trying to get back into the rhythm of posting regularly and I have recently got back into fiction books again which is adds a bit of variety to my reading schedule. I say schedule, I mean randomly picking up books when I walk past them and reading a few pages. Does you have a set time you read in, or do you just read randomly like me? Let me know down below using one of my platforms or comment down below 🙂

10 Books to Read to Educate Yourself on Racism

If you’ve been on the internet at all this week, you will have heard about George Floyd’s death. If you’re not up to date on the news, here’s a BBC article about what actually happened. It has sparked many conversations about racism, and part of that is how to be an ally. As a white person, I have realised that I need to educate myself further on how to combat racism and be actively anti racist. In order to do this, I have created a list of books I want to read to educate myself. Other things you can do include signing petition, donating money and simply speaking out.

  1. Your Silence Will Not Protect You by Audre Lorde- Over and over again, in the essays, speeches and poems collected in Your Silence Will Not Protect You, Lorde emphasises how important it is to speak up. To give witness: “What are the words you do not yet have? What do you need to say? What are the tyrannies you swallow day by day and attempt to make your own, until you will sicken and die of them, still in silence?”
  2. They Can’t Kill Us All: Ferguson, Baltimore, And A New Era In America’s Racial Justice Movement by Wesley Lowery – A deeply reported book that brings alive the quest for justice in the deaths of Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Freddie Gray, offering both unparalleled insight into the reality of police violence in America and an intimate, moving portrait of those working to end it
  3. Men We Reaped by Jesmyn Ward- In five years, Jesmyn Ward lost five men in her life, to drugs, accidents, suicide, and the bad luck that can follow people who live in poverty, particularly black men. Dealing with these losses, one after another, made Jesmyn ask the question: why? And as she began to write about the experience of living through all the dying, she realized the truth–and it took her breath away. 
  4. Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge- Exploring issues from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Reni Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge and counter racism. It is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of colour in Britain today.
  5. Freedom Is A Constant Struggle by Angela Davis – In these newly collected essays, interviews, and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world.
  6. How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi- In this book, Kendi weaves together an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science, bringing it all together with an engaging personal narrative of his own awakening to antiracism. How to Be an Antiracist is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond an awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a truly just and equitable society.
  7. Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do by Jennifer L. Eberhardt – From one of the world’s leading experts on unconscious racial bias, a personal examination of one of the central controversies and culturally powerful issues of our time, and its influence on contemporary race relations and criminal justice.
  8. White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin DiAngelo – The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality.
  9. The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin – A national bestseller when it first appeared in 1963, The Fire Next Time galvanized the nation and gave passionate voice to the emerging civil rights movement. At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin’s early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, the book is an intensely personal and provocative document.
  10. So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo – In this breakout book, Ijeoma Oluo explores the complex reality of today’s racial landscape–from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement–offering straightforward clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide

This list is by no means a comprehensive list, more a starting point to launch off of. For more books to read, check out this list by the New York Times, this Anti-Racist Reading List from Ibram X. Kendi and this list from Vogue. I hope this was helpful or useful, and feel free to reach out to me below with suggestions, feedback or simply to say hello!

10 Popular YA books I haven’t read (yet)

Hello and welcome (back) to beebliophile! I’m currently trying to post once a week, and after a week of looking at the task in my bullet journal I have finally pulled myself together and I’m writing a post!

The Twilight Series by Stephenie Meyer

This one has recently come to my attention due to the announcement that Stephenie Meyer is releasing another book, Midnight Sun. In case you haven’t heard, it’s Twilight but from Edward’s perspective. While I have considered reading these books many times, the lack of LGBTQ+ characters and the whole Bella deciding between 2 frankly creepy boys put me off a bit. I’m thinking of reading them, just to see what’s up before Midnight Sun is released. I’ve seen the movies though, so I already have a rough idea of the plot.


The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

I don’t have a good reason for not reading this. I want to read it and it’s meant to be excellent, I’ve just never got round to it and I’m not a huge reader of contemporary. As soon as I get my hands on a copy, I’m gonna read it.


The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

As I just said, I’m not a huge reader of contemporary YA. I’ve watched this movie, it was sad I guess. I’ve read a couple of John Green’s other books and I wasn’t gripped so I probably won’t end up reading this. Plus for personal reasons I don’t want to read about people with cancer at the moment.


The Perks of being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

This is starting to be a bit of a theme, I’ve seen the movie but I haven’t read the book. I promise I usually read the book first, it’s just I’m a huge fan of contemporary YA films and not so much the books. I’m on the fence about this one- maybe I’ll read it, maybe I won’t.


The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

Once again, you know it, I’ve seen the movie and haven’t read the book. This book I would like to read however, because I really enjoyed the movie and I’d love to know the writer’s style in telling the story. Why I haven’t read it? Just never got my hands on a copy.


All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Surprisingly I haven’t seen the movie for this one. Shocking, I know, but it didn’t really grab me. That’s the reason I haven’t read the book or watched the movie. And it’s a good enough reason for me.


The Sun is also a Star by Nicola Yoon

This one also has a Netflix movie which I haven’t watched. Contemporary YA, not my thing, didn’t grab me. Nothing more to say really.


Five Feet Apart by Rachael Lippincott

I actually recently watched the movie based on this book and it was very emotional. Still, probably won’t read it. Now I’ve seen the movie I know what happens and my lack of enthusiasm for contemporary YA means I likely won’t read it.


His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman

Let me say I have strong intentions to read these books, I really do. I even have The Book of Dust from the prequel series on my bookshelf. Yeah, I really don’t have a reason for not reading these except I haven’t got round to it.


13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher

I haven’t watched the TV series and I haven’t read the book and I don’t really intend to consume either. I’ve seen a lot of bad reviews of both and I’m put off. Just not for me.


So those are 10 popular YA books I haven’t read yet. Now you may be thinking- ‘Bee, why are there so many contemporary YA there when you don’t really like them a lot?’ You make a good point. The problem is when I looked for more popular YA books I haven’t read there aren’t many, because I have read a lot of popular YA fantasy. Like, A LOT. That’s why there’s so much contemporary YA on here. If you want to check out which books I have read, pop over to my goodreads!

Have I missed your favourite YA books? Do you think I should read the ones above? Comment below or feel free to contact me using this page, instagram or twitter!

10 things I do when I’m not blogging (lockdown version)

Hey guys! Sorry for the absence, I’ve been quite busy with schoolwork and just working on looking after myself during quarantine. I’m going to try and start blogging at least once a week and I want to say a massive thank you for being so patient with me! Since I’ve spent so much time recently not blogging, I thought I’d give you an insight into what I’ve been up to.

  1. Reading

It’ll come as no surprise that I read a lot. If you’re reading this you probably already knew that, since this is a blog dedicated to books. I read for about 30 mins to an hour everyday and I read at medium speed, I think? Recently I’ve been reading loads of poetry, but I also read plays, fiction and nonfiction and anything my family leave around the house. Just yesterday I was reading a book about coincidences that someone left on the stairs.

2. Writing

Like many bookworms, I also love to write. I write a daily diary, poetry and fiction. I’ve written one novel so far which is completely unreadable and I keep putting off editing it because I have this weird hate of reading my own work. I’m currently in the middle or writing another novel, a fantasy based on the four horsemen of the apocalypse. I also write poetry which I find very therapeutic.

3. Schoolwork

Not a hobby, but I am currently in Y12 at a sixth form college. The A-Levels I’m taking are Classical Civilisation, English and Economics which are an interesting mix. I’m not a fan of online lessons, but since they’re the only kind available at the moment I kind of have to do them. In Classical Civilisation we’re studying The Aeneid which I’m really enjoying, in English we’re analysing The Whitsun Weddings by Philip Larkin and in Economics we are learning about economic integration. I spend a fair chunk of time doing schoolwork.

4. Arts and Crafts

I consider myself quite a creative person. Since lockdown in the UK started I have been making pompoms, and I have loads of art supplies which I plunge into at random. My current favourites are some graphics pens, but I also enjoy scrapbooking, watercolours, acrylic painting, photography and making cards.

5. Listening to music

Listening to music is one of my favourite things to do. I like to listen to music when I’m out on a walk, or in the shower, or tidying my room, or anytime really. I’m listening to music while writing this blog post. I have quite an eclectic music taste, and I think spotify is as confused as I am from my recommended playlists. I’m really into the Imagine Dragons currently, as well as the soundtrack from the movie Burlesque and the musical Six.

6. Playing minecraft

I love minecraft. I don’t have animal crossing like seemingly everyone else in the entire world, but I’ve been spending a fair amount of time on minecraft which is definitely my favourite game to play. I like how you can do survival or creative and I love wandering round a world and creating houses wherever I feel like it and sometimes blowing stuff up for no reason. On the topic of games, I redownloaded candy crush and I can’t stop. It’s so fun and relaxing and addictive. My friends tease me for it but I refuse to delete it. It’s fun!

7. Watching films and TV shows

The TV show I am currently working my way through is New Girl, which is quite fun and has lots of short episodes which I like. I’m hugely indecisive with choosing movies, so my watchlist on streaming platforms is massive and I never seem to actually get round to watching any of them. I did watch The Mandalorian though, and I adore baby Yoda. He is so so so cute and his relationship with The Mandalorian makes my heart cry. If you have Disney Plus go watch The Mandalorian, it has all the awesome worldbuilding of Star Wars in more accessible episodes.

8. Practicing Taekwondo

Last September (2019) I started Taekwondo with one of my younger brothers. I’d always wanted to learn a martial art and though I am not a sporty person (understatement) I fell in love with Taekwondo. I love how you can move up through the belts and learn new patterns and kicks and punches, I love the way it makes me feel powerful and the way my body feels like my own when I’m practicing. When I’m concentrating on Taekwondo I forget the rest of the world and it’s a wonderful feeling.

9. Spending time with my family

The amount of time I spend with my family has gone up DRASTICALLY since the start of lockdown. Turns out that’s what being trapped in a house with five other people does! I’ve actually really enjoyed it though. As a family we’ve done an online escape room, had badminton tournaments, lego competitions and had a laugh. Before I would leave at 7:20 and not get back home till 5, and my Dad left at the same time and got back around 7, so I’ve got to spend lots more time with everyone. We’ve definitely got on better than I expected, even if my brother who’s two years younger than me is now taller than me. He keeps calling me Shorty.

10. Sleeping

How could I not mention sleeping? I do love a good nap, it just boosts my energy for the rest of the day and I have a very comfortable bed. Plus now that I don’t have to get up early I’m actually getting enough sleep and it’s great, I definitely recommend it if you can.

And that is 10 things I do when I’m not blogging! Obviously it’s not everything I do, but I think those are the things that take up the largest share of my time while in lockdown. Do you share any of my hobbies? What have you been up to in lockdown? I would love to hear about it, feel free to contact me using any of the links below, or check out what I’m reading on goodreads!