3 World Mental Health Day Reading Recommendations

When I saw that it was World Mental Health Day on the 10th October, I immediately wanted to write a post recommending a couple of books that I have found useful or relatable in their coverage of mental health. I even wrote a little list of books on my phone, which I fully intended to turn into a post immediately. It has been a rather long immediately of 3 days, but we got here eventually so let’s get into it!

Mental health is a very important topic to me. I have struggled with depression and an eating disorder, and I know how isolating it can feel when everyone else seems to be coping with the world fine and your brain is on fire. Please, please, please reach out to someone. Anyone. You don’t have to do this alone and you do not deserve to feel bad, whatever your thoughts tell you. Friends and family are a great option for a more casual chat, and if your bouts of bad mental health are frequent then it may be a good idea to talk to a doctor. If the idea of talking to someone in person makes you want to curl up into a ball and roll into a volcano, then there are organisations you can text, call or message online depending on what you’re most comfortable doing. I’ll leave some links at the bottom of the post for you to check out if you feel you need them.

Everyone’s experience of mental health is unique so the books that speak to me might not speak to you in the same way, but I hope these might give you some reading ideas, or help spark a discussion with people you know about mental health. Also, while I will not be discussing sensitive topics in this post, some of these books will contain them so make sure to check content warnings if you are worried that they may affect you.

1. It’s Okay to Feel Blue

It’s Okay to Feel Blue is a collection of writings about mental health by over 70 people. It really does have something for everyone, and I highly recommend it if you want something that you can dip in and out of easily. For my full review, click here.

2. Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Reasons to Stay Alive is an incredible book filled with Haig’s experiences of mental health. It is a mixture of conversations and personal anecdotes and lists, each one only a couple of pages each, so it is very easy to read. I think both people who have struggled with their mental health and those who haven’t should read this book, because it has some really great ways of describing how it feels to have depression. Also by Matt Haig is Notes on a Nervous Planet, another excellent nonfiction which also covers mental health but in a more general way, again in a fragmented format.

3. Anything by Holly Bourne

Holly Bourne is a writer or teen fiction and recently(ish) released her first adult novel. Her books frequently cover topics such as mental health, being yourself, relationships, and feminism. She is one of the authors that I will automatically read without even looking at the blurb- her writing is so emotional and honest. I will recommend them to pretty much anyone who wants to read some incredible contemporary fiction.

I decided to keep this short and sweet because I think long lists can definitely be overwhelming sometimes! Obviously there are lots of books that cover mental health, these are just a couple of my favourites.

List of UK mental health helplines here and another one here .

List of US mental health helplines here and here .

Please don’t suffer in silence, and look after yourself. Everyone has mental health, so even if you don’t have any particular problems with it you should still look after it like you would with physical health. Take a moment to breathe and check in with yourself- how are you feeling right now?

If you ever want someone to chat to, I’m happy to listen. Just message me on one of the links below or use my email on the links page. I hope you’re all having a good week ❤

April 2020 Round-Up

Hello and welcome to my April 2020 round-up! I honestly cannot believe it’s the end of April already and we are all stuck inside watching the weather through our windows. This is not how I thought 2020 was going to go, but I’m trying to make the best of the situation. I’ve been writing daily for Camp NaNoWriMo and making pom-poms like there’s no tomorrow. There is something incredibly therapeutic about winding wool round and round and round, especially while watching one of my favourite movies like Burlesque. Back to the books, I’m struggling to read as much as I did before, but I try to read a little each day, even if it is only a couple of pages. I’ve been feeling quite overwhelmed, so thanks for bearing with me while my blog posts are very sporadic. I will try to get some book reviews up soon!

Top 3 novels I read in April

Daisy Jones and the Six by Taylor Jenkins Reid

What I liked about it: the unique format, the drama, the way she writes about music

What I did not like about it: Nothing that I can think of.

My favourite character: Camila. What an amazing woman.

Position in series: 1/1

Genre: Historical fiction, music

Aurora Rising by Jay Kristoff and Amie Kaufman

What I liked about it: sassy misfit crew, aliens, lots of sarcasm, the action and excitement

What I did not like about it: my heart exploding

My favourite character: Tyler or Zila. I didn’t realise how awesome I think Tyler is until I actually considered it.

Position in series: 1/3

Genre: young adult, science fiction, fantasy

Dust by Hugh Howey

What I liked about it: an incredible conclusion to the Wool trilogy, the worldbuilding, the unravelling of the plot

What I did not like about it: DEATHS.

My favourite character: Jules. I would die for that woman. Amazing.

Position in series: 3/3

Genre: science fiction, post-apocalyptic

Poetry of the month: Wild Embers by Nikita Gill

What I liked about it: emotional and empowering

What I did not like about it: that it wasn’t longer!

My favourite poem: For Her

Genre: poetry, feminism

Special mention: Reasons to Stay Alive by Matt Haig

Why: this book means more to me than I can put into words. It has saved lives and reminds you that at no point are you alone. You can get through than this. There is more to life than your mental illness.

Genre: nonfiction, mental health

And that, folks, is my April in books. For a full list of everything I read in April, check out my goodreads which I try my best to keep up to date! I hope you’re all well, even if you’re feeling unmotivated like I am. Wishing you and your families all the best, and if you ever want to talk you can reach me through my contact page here, Instagram here or twitter here.